• amamblog:

ALLEN MEMORIAL ART MUSEUM AND FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT HOUSE TO OFFER ACTIVITIES ON ART MUSEUM DAY, SUNDAY, MAY 18
OBERLIN, OH—The Allen Memorial Art Museum (AMAM) will offer two events to mark this year’s celebration of Art Museum Day. Held by museums across North America, the annual day is organized by the Association of Art Museum Directors (AAMD) and coincides with International Museum Day.
There will be free admission and a craft activity at the AMAM’s Weltzheimer-Johnson House, designed by Frank Lloyd Wright, from noon to 5:00 p.m. on Sunday, May 18, as part of Art Museum Day. Located at 534 Morgan Street in Oberlin, the Weltzheimer-Johnson House is the first home designed by Wright in Ohio and as is one of the few in the state open to the general public.
The AMAM will also offer a special guided tour of its modern and contemporary gallery. This tour, “Redefining Normal: An Artistic Exploration,” asks visitors to consider, “What is normal? Is there a right way to make art, and to view it?” Oberlin College students Mengchen (Sue) Xu (OC ’16) and Lily Zimmerman (OC ’14) will host an afternoon of art, crafts, and conversation to explore these questions through the lens of accessibility and neurodiversity. The event will begin with a guided tour of relevant works from the museum’s collection, followed by the opportunity for participants to create their own works in response (materials will be provided). This event is sponsored by the AMAM and the college’s Office of Disability Services in celebration of International Museum Day.
“Art Museum Day emphasizes the essential role of art museums in their communities, highlights the value of the visual arts in society, and provides new opportunities for audiences to participate in programs,” said Andria Derstine, the John G.W. Cowles director of the AMAM.
“Art museums play a powerful role as community gathering places, bringing together people from all walks of life to experience the best of human creativity,” said Chris Anagnos, executive director of AAMD. “We are so pleased that Oberlin is joining us in this celebration.”
Visit http://www.aamd.org for a list of participating art museums. The AMAMalso invites visitors to share their experiences on Art Museum Day via social media with the hashtag #ArtMuseumDay.
Founded in 1917, the AMAM houses an encyclopedic collection of more than 14,000 objects selected to provide a comprehensive overview of the history of art from virtually every culture. Recognized as one of the five best academic museums in the country, the Allen is free and open to all.
Museum hours are Tuesday through Saturday, 10:00 am to 5:00 pm; Sunday, 1:00 to 5:00 p.m. The museum is closed Mondays and major holidays. Free educational or group guided tours may be arranged by calling the museum’s Education Office at (440) 775-8671.

    amamblog:

    ALLEN MEMORIAL ART MUSEUM AND FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT HOUSE TO OFFER ACTIVITIES ON ART MUSEUM DAY, SUNDAY, MAY 18

    OBERLIN, OH—The Allen Memorial Art Museum (AMAM) will offer two events to mark this year’s celebration of Art Museum Day. Held by museums across North America, the annual day is organized by the Association of Art Museum Directors (AAMD) and coincides with International Museum Day.

    There will be free admission and a craft activity at the AMAM’s Weltzheimer-Johnson House, designed by Frank Lloyd Wright, from noon to 5:00 p.m. on Sunday, May 18, as part of Art Museum Day. Located at 534 Morgan Street in Oberlin, the Weltzheimer-Johnson House is the first home designed by Wright in Ohio and as is one of the few in the state open to the general public.

    The AMAM will also offer a special guided tour of its modern and contemporary gallery. This tour, “Redefining Normal: An Artistic Exploration,” asks visitors to consider, “What is normal? Is there a right way to make art, and to view it?” Oberlin College students Mengchen (Sue) Xu (OC ’16) and Lily Zimmerman (OC ’14) will host an afternoon of art, crafts, and conversation to explore these questions through the lens of accessibility and neurodiversity. The event will begin with a guided tour of relevant works from the museum’s collection, followed by the opportunity for participants to create their own works in response (materials will be provided). This event is sponsored by the AMAM and the college’s Office of Disability Services in celebration of International Museum Day.

    “Art Museum Day emphasizes the essential role of art museums in their communities, highlights the value of the visual arts in society, and provides new opportunities for audiences to participate in programs,” said Andria Derstine, the John G.W. Cowles director of the AMAM.

    “Art museums play a powerful role as community gathering places, bringing together people from all walks of life to experience the best of human creativity,” said Chris Anagnos, executive director of AAMD. “We are so pleased that Oberlin is joining us in this celebration.”

    Visit http://www.aamd.org for a list of participating art museums. The AMAMalso invites visitors to share their experiences on Art Museum Day via social media with the hashtag #ArtMuseumDay.

    Founded in 1917, the AMAM houses an encyclopedic collection of more than 14,000 objects selected to provide a comprehensive overview of the history of art from virtually every culture. Recognized as one of the five best academic museums in the country, the Allen is free and open to all.

    Museum hours are Tuesday through Saturday, 10:00 am to 5:00 pm; Sunday, 1:00 to 5:00 p.m. The museum is closed Mondays and major holidays. Free educational or group guided tours may be arranged by calling the museum’s Education Office at (440) 775-8671.

    May
    16
    2014
  • hannesschreckensberger:

ROBERT VENTURI, WOODEN COLUMN, OBERLIN MUSEUM, OHIO, 1976 

The Ironic Column!

    hannesschreckensberger:

    ROBERT VENTURI, WOODEN COLUMN, OBERLIN MUSEUM, OHIO, 1976 

    The Ironic Column!

    May
    13
    2014
  • amamblog:

Please join us tomorrow for the final Tuesday Tea of the academic year. The annual Senior Tuesday Tea showcases the scholarship of Oberlin College students. Brenna Larson (OC ‘14) will discuss the complex and unusual iconography in the AMAM’s painting “Madonna del Suffragio” by an unknown Italian (Neopolitan) artist. Larson was selected through a competitive call for papers open to all graduating seniors. She is a graduating senior in Art History, student docent at the AMAM, and recipient of a Fulbright Research Grant. The talk will begin at 2:30 pm and will be followed by tea and light refreshments in the East Gallery.

    amamblog:

    Please join us tomorrow for the final Tuesday Tea of the academic year. The annual Senior Tuesday Tea showcases the scholarship of Oberlin College students.

    Brenna Larson (OC ‘14) will discuss the complex and unusual iconography in the AMAM’s painting “Madonna del Suffragio” by an unknown Italian (Neopolitan) artist. Larson was selected through a competitive call for papers open to all graduating seniors. She is
    a graduating senior in Art History, student docent at the AMAM, and recipient of a Fulbright Research Grant. The talk will begin at 2:30 pm and will be followed by tea and light refreshments in the East Gallery.

    May
    13
    2014
  • amamblog:

The Real “47 Ronin” - The recently released 47 Ronin, a visually striking film but a critical and box office disappointment, is very loosely based on one of the most famous heroic tales from Japan, typically called Chūshingura 忠臣蔵 (“A Treasury of Loyal Vassals”).  The many versions of the story were inspired by an historical event of the early eighteenth century.  Forty-seven loyal samurai, rendered rōnin 浪人 (lit. “wave” or “wandering”  persons, i.e. masterless samurai) by the unjust death of their lord,  planned an elaborate revenge against the wicked lord who caused their master’s demise.  Chūshingura has been retold and re-imagined in many forms, beginning with the amazing bunraku puppet theater, followed by kabuki theater, and of course many later film, television, manga, and anime versions.  Not surprisingly, the story was also the basis for countless ukiyo-e wooblock prints in Early Modern Japan, and the vast AMAM collection provides us with an excellent example.
In this print by one of Japan’s best-known printmakers, Hiroshige, the forty-seven rōninmake their final assault on the mansion of their enemy.  It is winter, and the white snow that covers the setting also makes the figures stand out in their complex and colorful armor.  Both the tension of the moment and the narrative flow are enhanced by the dramatic diagonals: the line of men, the snow-encrusted pine branch, and the walls of the mansion.  This movement is stopped in the lower left, however, by a moment of drama: the rōnin have cleverly prepared stalks of bamboo, bent and tied like bows.  When one end is inserted in the top of a sliding wooden panel (used in Japanese traditional architecture both for security and insulation) and the other end secured on the ground, cutting the ropes with their swords causes the bamboo to spring apart and pop the panel out of its track, allowing the rōnin to burst unexpectedly into the interior.  Of course if that hadn’t worked, the two rōnin with a giant axe and giant hammer (at the center of the line) might have come in handy.  To see other Chūshingura prints from the series by Hiroshige and others, search the AMAM eMuseum database by clicking here. Although it is only in Japanese with no English subtitles, for a clip from a bunraku puppet theater performance of the scene just preceding the attack, click here.
Image:Utagawa Hiroshige (Japanese, 1797–1858)Breaking into Moronao’s Mansion During the Night Attack, Act 11, no. 2, from the series Chushingura, Mid-1830s Color woodblock print Mary A. Ainsworth Bequest, 1950.1078 

    amamblog:

    The Real “47 Ronin”The recently released 47 Ronin, a visually striking film but a critical and box office disappointment, is very loosely based on one of the most famous heroic tales from Japan, typically called Chūshingura 忠臣蔵 (A Treasury of Loyal Vassals).  The many versions of the story were inspired by an historical event of the early eighteenth century.  Forty-seven loyal samurai, rendered rōnin 浪人 (lit. “wave” or “wandering”  persons, i.e. masterless samurai) by the unjust death of their lord,  planned an elaborate revenge against the wicked lord who caused their master’s demise.  Chūshingura has been retold and re-imagined in many forms, beginning with the amazing bunraku puppet theater, followed by kabuki theater, and of course many later film, television, manga, and anime versions.  Not surprisingly, the story was also the basis for countless ukiyo-e wooblock prints in Early Modern Japan, and the vast AMAM collection provides us with an excellent example.

    In this print by one of Japan’s best-known printmakers, Hiroshige, the forty-seven rōninmake their final assault on the mansion of their enemy.  It is winter, and the white snow that covers the setting also makes the figures stand out in their complex and colorful armor.  Both the tension of the moment and the narrative flow are enhanced by the dramatic diagonals: the line of men, the snow-encrusted pine branch, and the walls of the mansion.  This movement is stopped in the lower left, however, by a moment of drama: the rōnin have cleverly prepared stalks of bamboo, bent and tied like bows.  When one end is inserted in the top of a sliding wooden panel (used in Japanese traditional architecture both for security and insulation) and the other end secured on the ground, cutting the ropes with their swords causes the bamboo to spring apart and pop the panel out of its track, allowing the rōnin to burst unexpectedly into the interior.  Of course if that hadn’t worked, the two rōnin with a giant axe and giant hammer (at the center of the line) might have come in handy.  

    To see other Chūshingura prints from the series by Hiroshige and others, search the AMAM eMuseum database by clicking here

    Although it is only in Japanese with no English subtitles, for a clip from a
    bunraku puppet theater performance of the scene just preceding the attack, click here.


    Image:
    Utagawa Hiroshige (Japanese, 1797–1858)
    Breaking into Moronao’s Mansion During the Night Attack, Act 11, no. 2, from the series Chushingura, Mid-1830s
    Color woodblock print
    Mary A. Ainsworth Bequest, 1950.1078
     

    May
    06
    2014
  • amamblog:

Please join us this week for the last First Thursday event of the academic year. This month, we will be holding the evening event at the Weltzheimer/Johnson House, located just a mile and a half from the center of campus.Pradnya Martz will give a talk titled “Growing with the Times,” discussing the largely unrealized landscape plan that Frank Lloyd Wright designed for Oberlin’s Usonian house. Martz has served as consulting curator for the house since 1998 and is an architect/project manager at Oberlin College. At the conclusion of her talk, Martz will lead a tour of the surrounding landscape and grounds. The talk will begin at 5:30pm, and will be followed by a small reception. The Weltzheimer/Johnson House is located at 534 Morgan Street. Please see the link for directions. If you are walking from campus, Walk south on South Professor St for a half mile. Turn right on Morgan Street, and continue for one mile. The house is located on the right side of the street, set back from the road. The walk will take about a half hour.
 

    amamblog:

    Please join us this week for the last First Thursday event of the academic year. This month, we will be holding the evening event at the Weltzheimer/Johnson House, located just a mile and a half from the center of campus.

    Pradnya Martz will give a talk titled “Growing with the Times,” discussing the largely unrealized landscape plan that Frank Lloyd Wright designed for Oberlin’s Usonian house. Martz has served as consulting curator for the house since 1998 and is an architect/project manager at Oberlin College. At the conclusion of her talk, Martz will lead a tour of the surrounding landscape and grounds. 

    The talk will begin at 5:30pm, and will be followed by a small reception. 

    The Weltzheimer/Johnson House is located at 534 Morgan Street. Please see the link for directions. If you are walking from campus, 
    Walk south on South Professor St for a half mile. Turn right on Morgan Street, and continue for one mile. The house is located on the right side of the street, set back from the road. The walk will take about a half hour.

     

    Apr
    30
    2014
  • Fall 2014 AMAM Print Room and Research Student Assistant

    The Office of Academic Programs at the Allen Memorial Art Museum is seeking a part-time (10-12 hours/week) Oberlin College student assistant for the fall 2014 semester (with the possibility of continuing into the spring semester) to help with College and Conservatory classes using the museum’s collection. The duties of the student assistants will include:

    • pulling out, setting up, and putting away works of art from museum storage
    • monitoring classes and ensuring the safety of the art during class visits
    • conducting research on objects in the collection, art movements, periods, and artists
    • research in preparation for future exhibitions and related events
    • a variety of administrative tasks 

    Applicants must be very detail-oriented, highly responsible, capable of working independently, in possession of strong research and communication skills, as well as able to lift archival boxes and handle works with great care. Computer proficiency is needed, particularly Word and Excel. Applicants must have taken at least four art history classes. Please note that studio art or architectural history courses cannot be substituted for the required four art history classes. In conjunction with the AMAM’s yearlong exhibition theme “The Americas,” greater consideration will be given to students with interdisciplinary background including but not limited to Africana Studies, Comparative American Studies, Comparative Literature, Hispanic Studies, History, Jazz Studies, Latin American Studies, Musicology, and Politics.

    Please submit the following documents in a single file via email to Curator of Academic Programs Dr. Liliana Milkova (lmilkova@oberlin.edu) by 5 pm on Friday, May 9, 2014.

    • One-page resume with GPA and a list of references (Oberlin faculty preferred)
    • One-page cover letter with a brief summary of interest and abilities (please note that the letter will serve as your writing sample)
    • Unofficial transcript

    INTERVIEWS WILL BE HELD DURING THE WEEK OF MAY 12, 2014. WE WILL CONTACT ONLY CANDIDATES SELECTED FOR AN INTERVIEW.

    ALL CANDIDATES MUST BE CURRENT OBERLIN COLLEGE STUDENTS IN FALL 2014.

    Employer Information

     Founded in 1917, the Allen Memorial Art Museum (AMAM) is one of the finest college or university collections in the United States. Comprising more than 14,000 works of art from virtually every culture and spanning the history of art, the AMAM’s collection is a vital cultural resource for the students, faculty, and staff of Oberlin College as well as the surrounding community. Notable strengths include seventeenth-century Dutch and Flemish art, nineteenth and early twentieth-century European and contemporary American art, and Asian, European, and American works on paper. The collection is housed in an impressive Italian Renaissance-style building designed by Cass Gilbert and named after its founder, Dr. Dudley Peter Allen (B.A. 1875), a distinguished graduate and trustee of Oberlin College. In 1977, Venturi, Scott Brown and Associates designed an addition that represents one of the earliest and finest examples of postmodern architecture in the United States.

    Apr
    29
    2014
  • AMAM Curatorial Research Assistant, Summer 2014

    A part-time (15-20 hours/week) Oberlin College student is needed for the summer 2014 term to aid the Curator of European and American Art in collections research and in preparations for upcoming exhibitions. The student will assist with the installation of the upcoming exhibition “Art and Life in Early America: The First Hundred Years, 1776-1876,” as well as contribute to research on the AMAM’s collection. The applicant must have taken at least 4 courses in art history or another relevant field, and have excellent research and writing skills. Preference will be given to students interested in art prior to 1900 and to those who have knowledge of French, Italian, or German.

    Please submit a one-page resume with GPA and the names of three references (Oberlin faculty preferred), a one-page cover letter with a brief summary of interest and abilities, and an unofficial transcript to Andaleeb Banta, abanta@oberlin.edu, Curator of European and American Art, by Friday, April 25, 2013. Only candidates selected for an interview will be contacted

    Apr
    17
    2014
  • NEW FALL 2014 HALF COURSE ON CONSERVATION!

    ARTS 220 Conservation of the AMAM King Sculpture Court 

    Fridays, 2:30-4:20pm (Art 172/ Seminar Room)    

    First Module, Half Course 

    Heather Galloway - Course Limit: 12, Consent of Instructor Required

    Taught in conjunction with the cleaning of the Allen Memorial Art Museum King Sculpture Court, this class will look at conservation decision-making as it relates to the decorative painted surfaces. The class will introduce students to the interdisciplinary nature of conservation by emphasizing the ways that conservators draw on science, art, and art history in their work.  We will examine a number of factors that determine protocols for the cleaning and retouching of the Allen’s decorative cycle. These include scientific analysis, cleaning tests, the aging characteristics of paints and varnishes, and archival research. We will take the opportunity to observe the conservation work as it unfolds.

    Intended to be open to students from all disciplines, the course has no prerequisites. As the class size will be kept small to accommodate teaching in the museum consent is required. Please email hgallowa@oberlin.edu and indicate your year, major and your interest in the class. 

    (picture from the Allen’s official blog)

    Apr
    10
    2014
  • Call for 2-D Art

    To be shown in Fisher Gallery this commencement 2014 alongside artworks from the Allen’s Art Rental Program! 
    A group of Exhibition Initiative members are working to put on an art show that is centered around the theme of two dimensional artworks. The incentive for this show is specific to Oberlin, an environment where many recent student shows have overlooked more traditional mediums, reaching out to artists who make work within the realm of two dimensions - such as drawing, painting, and collage. Several ExI members are working on this show, eager to remind the audience of the great value of traditional mediums: that paintings on a wall can still inspire its viewers - even if its been done a million times before. Additionally, the group is working with the Allen to incorporate other two-dimensional works from the museum’s Art Rental Program to create themes with which the student work that is submitted can react to and interact with. 
    The show will feature three over-arching themes identified by works from the Allen. Please submit works inspired by / in response to / in dialogue with the following works from the Allen’s Art Rental Program under one of the following themes:
    -Approaches to portraiture / Alice Neel, Olivia ; Rev. Albert Wagner, Remember It’s Just Maybe
    -Approaches to abstract work / Frank Stella, Lithograph; Forbes Whiteside, Untitled
    -Approaches to process-based work  / Claes Oldenburg, Plate XII;  Barbara Strasen, A Day in the Desert, #23
    Please visit exhibitioninitiative.com for more information. Email image submissions to exhibition.initiative@gmail.com by APRIL 25, 2014! Include dimensions please! This event is in conjunction with Exhibition Initiative.
    Apr
    10
    2014
  • Q: This is a little silly asking this through tumblr but I am doing research for an art history class about the correspondences between Sol LeWitt and Eva Hesse. Do you have any suggestions about where to search for primary documents (scans of their postcards/letters/conversations)?

    -asked by jketcher

    A: 

    archivesofamericanartlibrarian:

    jketcher:

    archivesofamericanart:

    Not silly at all! Although the best way to get a question like this answered by our reference staff is to submit it through our Ask Us page, we gladly accept questions in any format.

    In our collections your best bet would be the microfilm of the Eva Hesse papers, which contains 524 letters and postcards. To consult these you would talk to one of the librarians at your school and they can arrange for us to send a copy of the microfilm through interlibrary loan, or, if you are near DC or NY you can come to our offices to consult the microfilm. You may also want to check out our oral history interview with Sol Lewitt from 1974 (the transcript is online), although he only mentions Hesse briefly.  

    Beyond our collections, you will definitely want to check out the Eva Hesse Archives at Oberlin College’s Allen Memorial Museum of Art - they have digitized what looks like a substantial portion of the archives and it does appear to include correspondence from Lewitt.

    Good luck!

    Bettina Smith

    Digital Projects Librarian and Tumblarian, Archives of American Art

    Social media is amazing, people are lovely, and I’m geeking out a little bit. 

    Always happy to support the cause of geeking out over art history!

    Especially if it involves Oberlin! ;)

    Apr
    08
    2014
  • AMAM Education and Public Programs Summer Interns

    The Curator of Education at the Allen Memorial Art Museum is seeking two (2) student interns who will work from June 1 – August 29 to help with Education Department programs.  Major duties will include: assisting with the seventh annual Oberlin Chalk Walk event and related public workshops; helping plan and run two week-long summer camps for teens and elementary school children (one in June, one in August); working on the creation of new gallery labels, and other interpretive matierals for the museum’s fall exhibitions and permanent collection; providing tours of the galleries to school-age and public groups; training and docenting at the museum’s Frank Lloyd Wright designed house for Sunday Open House days; creating and adding to museum’s online and social media content; archival and research work, and administrative duties. Duties will be worked on collaboratively with both interns, as needed, but specific projects will be divided up between the two positions.

    The ideal candidate will have working knowledge of Art History and/or have taken the Practicum in Museum Education course.  Applicants must be detail-oriented, capable of working both collaboratively and independently, possess strong research skills, and be comfortable speaking to and working with learners of all ages.  Basic computer proficiency is needed.  Background working with kids a plus.

    Both positions will be paid at a rate of $8.50/hour, and should expect to work between 20-25 hours per week.

    Please submit a cover letter describing your interest in the position and relevant abilities (please note that the cover letter will serve as your writing sample), a copy of your current resume to Jason Trimmer, Curator of Education, at jtrimmer@oberlin.edu. Applications can also be dropped off at the front Visitor Services desk of the museum.

    Applications must be received by Friday, April 18, no later than 5pm. Candidate interviews will take place at the end of April.

    Apr
    08
    2014
  • CALL FOR PAPERS — AMAM Tuesday Tea Lecture Series

    Open To: All Oberlin College Seniors

    Date of Presentation: Tuesday, May 13 at 2:30pm

    At the Allen Memorial Art Museum

    The Allen Memorial Art Museum is seeking submissions from Oberlin College seniors for a lecture to be presented during the last Tuesday Tea of the spring 2014 semester, May 13, at 2:30 pm.  Since 2008, the AMAM has provided this opportunity to celebrate the achievements of a graduating Oberlin student.

    Tuesday Teas are a popular adult lecture series that occurs each month during the academic year.  Past speakers have included AMAM staff, Oberlin College professors, outside scholars, and other art professionals.  Talks generally last about 30 minutes, followed by a question and answer period, and are followed by light refreshments.

    Papers should focus on either a single work or small group of works in the museum’s collection, preferably on view in the galleries.  A one-page abstract should be submitted (in person or via email), along with a resume and letter of interest, to me by Monday, April 7, no later than 5:00pm

    An Art History or Studio major is not required, but the student’s academic background
    and familiarity with his or her subject will be taken into consideration.

    Abstracts will be read by AMAM curatorial staff and the selection announced by
    the end of the day Monday, April 14, 2014.

    Mar
    14
    2014
  • amamblog:

Looking for something to do this Saturday? Why not come out to this semester’s Community Day at the AMAM? We’ll have art activities and family self-guides available from 11am until 3pm. It’s free and open to ALL members of the public. Hope to see you then!

    amamblog:

    Looking for something to do this Saturday? Why not come out to this semester’s Community Day at the AMAM? We’ll have art activities and family self-guides available from 11am until 3pm. It’s free and open to ALL members of the public. Hope to see you then!

    Mar
    13
    2014

  • amamblog:

    In conjunction with today’s national opening of the film The Monuments Men, please consider a donation to the AMAM’s Charles P. Parkhurst (OC ’38) Art Conservation Fund.

    The endowed fund honors the memory of Charles P. Parkhurst, who was director of the AMAM and a professor at Oberlin from 1949-62, by providing a consistent base of support for the preservation of the museum’s works of art.  If you are interested in making a donation, please contact the AMAM director’s office at 440-775-8665.

    Parkhurst served as part of the team of art historians and curators – known as the Monuments Men – tasked with tracking down works of art lost or stolen during World War II.  For his efforts, he was awarded the Chevalier de la Légion d’Honneur by the government of France. 

    Last November, the AMAM hosted Robert Edsel, author of the book The Monuments Men:  Allied Heroes, Nazi Thieves, and the Greatest Treasure Hunt in History, to commemorate Parkhurst’s and his colleagues’ work.  Your generous donation to the AMAM Parkhurst Conservation Fund would help to support Parkhurst’s vision – and that of the other Monuments Men – that the care and preservation of artworks is of prime importance for our shared cultural heritage.

    Images:
    Above: Charles Parkhurst during World War II
    Below: 
    MFAA (Monuments, Fine Arts, and Archives) officers at the Munich collecting point, including  Lt. Charles Parkhurst, second from right. (National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., Gallery Archives)

    Feb
    08
    2014
  • Mark your calendars! Please join us for Tuesday Tea with Sarah McLusky ‘13, curatorial assistant for the Office of Academic Programs, at the Allen Memorial Art Museum on Tuesday, February 11 at 2:30 pm!

    Mark your calendars! Please join us for Tuesday Tea with Sarah McLusky ‘13, curatorial assistant for the Office of Academic Programs, at the Allen Memorial Art Museum on Tuesday, February 11 at 2:30 pm!

    Feb
    08
    2014
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Coffee with Clarence: The Arts at Oberlin

Welcome to Coffee With Clarence, an Oberlin art community blog run by the Clarence Ward Art Library. Check back to find out about art events, new books at the library, work by Oberlin College students and just anything that's interesting and art-related.
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