• AMAM Curatorial Research Assistant, Summer 2014

    A part-time (15-20 hours/week) Oberlin College student is needed for the summer 2014 term to aid the Curator of European and American Art in collections research and in preparations for upcoming exhibitions. The student will assist with the installation of the upcoming exhibition “Art and Life in Early America: The First Hundred Years, 1776-1876,” as well as contribute to research on the AMAM’s collection. The applicant must have taken at least 4 courses in art history or another relevant field, and have excellent research and writing skills. Preference will be given to students interested in art prior to 1900 and to those who have knowledge of French, Italian, or German.

    Please submit a one-page resume with GPA and the names of three references (Oberlin faculty preferred), a one-page cover letter with a brief summary of interest and abilities, and an unofficial transcript to Andaleeb Banta, abanta@oberlin.edu, Curator of European and American Art, by Friday, April 25, 2013. Only candidates selected for an interview will be contacted

    Apr
    17
    2014
  • NEW FALL 2014 HALF COURSE ON CONSERVATION!

    ARTS 220 Conservation of the AMAM King Sculpture Court 

    Fridays, 2:30-4:20pm (Art 172/ Seminar Room)    

    First Module, Half Course 

    Heather Galloway - Course Limit: 12, Consent of Instructor Required

    Taught in conjunction with the cleaning of the Allen Memorial Art Museum King Sculpture Court, this class will look at conservation decision-making as it relates to the decorative painted surfaces. The class will introduce students to the interdisciplinary nature of conservation by emphasizing the ways that conservators draw on science, art, and art history in their work.  We will examine a number of factors that determine protocols for the cleaning and retouching of the Allen’s decorative cycle. These include scientific analysis, cleaning tests, the aging characteristics of paints and varnishes, and archival research. We will take the opportunity to observe the conservation work as it unfolds.

    Intended to be open to students from all disciplines, the course has no prerequisites. As the class size will be kept small to accommodate teaching in the museum consent is required. Please email hgallowa@oberlin.edu and indicate your year, major and your interest in the class. 

    (picture from the Allen’s official blog)

    Apr
    10
    2014
  • Call for 2-D Art

    To be shown in Fisher Gallery this commencement 2014 alongside artworks from the Allen’s Art Rental Program! 
    A group of Exhibition Initiative members are working to put on an art show that is centered around the theme of two dimensional artworks. The incentive for this show is specific to Oberlin, an environment where many recent student shows have overlooked more traditional mediums, reaching out to artists who make work within the realm of two dimensions - such as drawing, painting, and collage. Several ExI members are working on this show, eager to remind the audience of the great value of traditional mediums: that paintings on a wall can still inspire its viewers - even if its been done a million times before. Additionally, the group is working with the Allen to incorporate other two-dimensional works from the museum’s Art Rental Program to create themes with which the student work that is submitted can react to and interact with. 
    The show will feature three over-arching themes identified by works from the Allen. Please submit works inspired by / in response to / in dialogue with the following works from the Allen’s Art Rental Program under one of the following themes:
    -Approaches to portraiture / Alice Neel, Olivia ; Rev. Albert Wagner, Remember It’s Just Maybe
    -Approaches to abstract work / Frank Stella, Lithograph; Forbes Whiteside, Untitled
    -Approaches to process-based work  / Claes Oldenburg, Plate XII;  Barbara Strasen, A Day in the Desert, #23
    Please visit exhibitioninitiative.com for more information. Email image submissions to exhibition.initiative@gmail.com by APRIL 25, 2014! Include dimensions please! This event is in conjunction with Exhibition Initiative.
    Apr
    10
    2014
  • Q: This is a little silly asking this through tumblr but I am doing research for an art history class about the correspondences between Sol LeWitt and Eva Hesse. Do you have any suggestions about where to search for primary documents (scans of their postcards/letters/conversations)?

    -asked by jketcher

    A: 

    archivesofamericanartlibrarian:

    jketcher:

    archivesofamericanart:

    Not silly at all! Although the best way to get a question like this answered by our reference staff is to submit it through our Ask Us page, we gladly accept questions in any format.

    In our collections your best bet would be the microfilm of the Eva Hesse papers, which contains 524 letters and postcards. To consult these you would talk to one of the librarians at your school and they can arrange for us to send a copy of the microfilm through interlibrary loan, or, if you are near DC or NY you can come to our offices to consult the microfilm. You may also want to check out our oral history interview with Sol Lewitt from 1974 (the transcript is online), although he only mentions Hesse briefly.  

    Beyond our collections, you will definitely want to check out the Eva Hesse Archives at Oberlin College’s Allen Memorial Museum of Art - they have digitized what looks like a substantial portion of the archives and it does appear to include correspondence from Lewitt.

    Good luck!

    Bettina Smith

    Digital Projects Librarian and Tumblarian, Archives of American Art

    Social media is amazing, people are lovely, and I’m geeking out a little bit. 

    Always happy to support the cause of geeking out over art history!

    Especially if it involves Oberlin! ;)

    Apr
    08
    2014
  • AMAM Education and Public Programs Summer Interns

    The Curator of Education at the Allen Memorial Art Museum is seeking two (2) student interns who will work from June 1 – August 29 to help with Education Department programs.  Major duties will include: assisting with the seventh annual Oberlin Chalk Walk event and related public workshops; helping plan and run two week-long summer camps for teens and elementary school children (one in June, one in August); working on the creation of new gallery labels, and other interpretive matierals for the museum’s fall exhibitions and permanent collection; providing tours of the galleries to school-age and public groups; training and docenting at the museum’s Frank Lloyd Wright designed house for Sunday Open House days; creating and adding to museum’s online and social media content; archival and research work, and administrative duties. Duties will be worked on collaboratively with both interns, as needed, but specific projects will be divided up between the two positions.

    The ideal candidate will have working knowledge of Art History and/or have taken the Practicum in Museum Education course.  Applicants must be detail-oriented, capable of working both collaboratively and independently, possess strong research skills, and be comfortable speaking to and working with learners of all ages.  Basic computer proficiency is needed.  Background working with kids a plus.

    Both positions will be paid at a rate of $8.50/hour, and should expect to work between 20-25 hours per week.

    Please submit a cover letter describing your interest in the position and relevant abilities (please note that the cover letter will serve as your writing sample), a copy of your current resume to Jason Trimmer, Curator of Education, at jtrimmer@oberlin.edu. Applications can also be dropped off at the front Visitor Services desk of the museum.

    Applications must be received by Friday, April 18, no later than 5pm. Candidate interviews will take place at the end of April.

    Apr
    08
    2014
  • CALL FOR PAPERS — AMAM Tuesday Tea Lecture Series

    Open To: All Oberlin College Seniors

    Date of Presentation: Tuesday, May 13 at 2:30pm

    At the Allen Memorial Art Museum

    The Allen Memorial Art Museum is seeking submissions from Oberlin College seniors for a lecture to be presented during the last Tuesday Tea of the spring 2014 semester, May 13, at 2:30 pm.  Since 2008, the AMAM has provided this opportunity to celebrate the achievements of a graduating Oberlin student.

    Tuesday Teas are a popular adult lecture series that occurs each month during the academic year.  Past speakers have included AMAM staff, Oberlin College professors, outside scholars, and other art professionals.  Talks generally last about 30 minutes, followed by a question and answer period, and are followed by light refreshments.

    Papers should focus on either a single work or small group of works in the museum’s collection, preferably on view in the galleries.  A one-page abstract should be submitted (in person or via email), along with a resume and letter of interest, to me by Monday, April 7, no later than 5:00pm

    An Art History or Studio major is not required, but the student’s academic background
    and familiarity with his or her subject will be taken into consideration.

    Abstracts will be read by AMAM curatorial staff and the selection announced by
    the end of the day Monday, April 14, 2014.

    Mar
    14
    2014
  • amamblog:

Looking for something to do this Saturday? Why not come out to this semester’s Community Day at the AMAM? We’ll have art activities and family self-guides available from 11am until 3pm. It’s free and open to ALL members of the public. Hope to see you then!

    amamblog:

    Looking for something to do this Saturday? Why not come out to this semester’s Community Day at the AMAM? We’ll have art activities and family self-guides available from 11am until 3pm. It’s free and open to ALL members of the public. Hope to see you then!

    Mar
    13
    2014

  • amamblog:

    In conjunction with today’s national opening of the film The Monuments Men, please consider a donation to the AMAM’s Charles P. Parkhurst (OC ’38) Art Conservation Fund.

    The endowed fund honors the memory of Charles P. Parkhurst, who was director of the AMAM and a professor at Oberlin from 1949-62, by providing a consistent base of support for the preservation of the museum’s works of art.  If you are interested in making a donation, please contact the AMAM director’s office at 440-775-8665.

    Parkhurst served as part of the team of art historians and curators – known as the Monuments Men – tasked with tracking down works of art lost or stolen during World War II.  For his efforts, he was awarded the Chevalier de la Légion d’Honneur by the government of France. 

    Last November, the AMAM hosted Robert Edsel, author of the book The Monuments Men:  Allied Heroes, Nazi Thieves, and the Greatest Treasure Hunt in History, to commemorate Parkhurst’s and his colleagues’ work.  Your generous donation to the AMAM Parkhurst Conservation Fund would help to support Parkhurst’s vision – and that of the other Monuments Men – that the care and preservation of artworks is of prime importance for our shared cultural heritage.

    Images:
    Above: Charles Parkhurst during World War II
    Below: 
    MFAA (Monuments, Fine Arts, and Archives) officers at the Munich collecting point, including  Lt. Charles Parkhurst, second from right. (National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., Gallery Archives)

    Feb
    08
    2014
  • Mark your calendars! Please join us for Tuesday Tea with Sarah McLusky ‘13, curatorial assistant for the Office of Academic Programs, at the Allen Memorial Art Museum on Tuesday, February 11 at 2:30 pm!

    Mark your calendars! Please join us for Tuesday Tea with Sarah McLusky ‘13, curatorial assistant for the Office of Academic Programs, at the Allen Memorial Art Museum on Tuesday, February 11 at 2:30 pm!

    Feb
    08
    2014
  • amamblog:

For the next several days, the blog will focus on the “Les Enfants Terribles” section of our current exhibition The Human Comedy: Chronicles of 19th-Century France. The forty-nine prints in Gavarni’s series Les enfants terribles are among his most popular and well-known works, legendary for their witty and memorable captions. Gavarni’s enfants terribles are social landmines, “holy terrors” who wittingly or unwittingly reveal the pettiness and duplicity of their parents. An illustrator of children’s books, Gavarni was the father of two children of his own, to whom he was very attached. Gavarni loved the spontaneous poses and gestures of children and admired them for their disarming honesty.
The term enfants terribles, originally reserved for terrifyingly candid children who embarrass their parents, came to be used to describe unconven-tional or unorthodox artists and writers—like Baudelaire and Flaubert—whose works reveal harsh truths about society that are embarrassing to guardians of the status quo.The Human Comedy was curated by Libby Murphy, associate professor of French at Oberlin College, with assistance from AMAM Curatorial Assistant Sara Green (OC ’12) and Curator of European and American Art Andaleeb Badiee Banta.Image:Paul Gavarni (French, 1804–1866)La paternité ça gâte la taille ! (Fatherhood, it ruins the waistline!), 1853LithographGift of Eugene L. Garbaty, 1951.79.183

    amamblog:

    For the next several days, the blog will focus on the “Les Enfants Terribles” section of our current exhibition The Human Comedy: Chronicles of 19th-Century France

    The forty-nine prints in Gavarni’s series
     Les enfants terribles are among his most popular and well-known works, legendary for their witty and memorable captions. Gavarni’s enfants terribles are social landmines, “holy terrors” who wittingly or unwittingly reveal the pettiness and duplicity of their parents. An illustrator of children’s books, Gavarni was the father of two children of his own, to whom he was very attached. Gavarni loved the spontaneous poses and gestures of children and admired them for their disarming honesty.

    The term enfants terribles, originally reserved for terrifyingly candid children who embarrass their parents, came to be used to describe unconven-tional or unorthodox artists and writers—like Baudelaire and Flaubert—whose works reveal harsh truths about society that are embarrassing to guardians of the status quo.

    The Human Comedy was 
    curated by Libby Murphy, associate professor of French at Oberlin College, with assistance from AMAM Curatorial Assistant Sara Green (OC ’12) and Curator of European and American Art Andaleeb Badiee Banta.

    Image:
    Paul Gavarni (French, 1804–1866)
    La paternité ça gâte la taille ! (Fatherhood, it ruins the waistline!), 1853
    Lithograph
    Gift of Eugene L. Garbaty, 1951.79.183

    Nov
    14
    2013
  • amamblog:

    Check out this great video from the Smithsonian’s website (there is a commercial embedded, alas): “Jade bi (discs), from China, that resemble modern-day CD’s or donuts, and date to the late Neolithic Period, Liangzhu culture (ca. 3300-2250 BC) remain a mystery. Researchers at the Smithsonian’s Freer and Sackler galleries in Washington, D.C., are among those who have studied the bi.”

    The AMAM’s own bi disc is on display in the South Ambulatory gallery: 

    AMAM - Chinese Bi disc

    Bi discs were an important form of early ritual jade object. It is not known exactly how the discs functioned, although it is thought that they may have been used in ceremonies honoring the heavens. Bi discs were also placed on top of bodies in graves. Later Chinese believed that jade helped preserve corpses from decay, and it is possible this belief prevailed in ancient times as well. The bi form persisted in Chinese culture for thousands of years. By the Han dynasty (206 BC-220 AD), the form no longer had any ritual function but still possessed great power as a symbol of wealth and high culture.

    Image:
    Chinese
    Bi disc, 1046–256 BC
    Jade
    Overall: 1/4 x 8 3/4 in. (0.6 x 22.2 cm)
    Gift of Mrs. Donald W. Evans in memory of her husband, 1947.89

    Oct
    29
    2013
  • amamblog:

Now on view in the exhibition “The Human Comedy: Chronicles of 19th Century France.” In this print, the popular proto-realist lithographer Honoré Daumier imagines a battle between the two rival aesthetic schools of mid-century France: neoclassical idealism and contemporary realism. Realism is portrayed as a working-class underdog—his rustic clogs, disheveled, ill-fitting clothes, and short, stocky physique contrast sharply with the athletic nakedness of his rival Idealism. Realism’s small, square palette and clumsy paintbrush seem to be no match for Idealism’s long, uplifted maulstick (used to steady a paintbrush) and great, oval-shaped palette-shield. And yet, Realism’s low center of gravity and determined expression suggest that these forces are not as mis-matched as they may at first appear. The fact that Idealism might be losing his touch (and his relevance) is suggested by his old man’s face and the round spectacles he wears—so at odds with his classically well-proportioned body.The Human Comedy is on view through December 22, 2013.Image:Honoré Daumier (French, 1808–1879)Combat des écoles—L’Idéalisme et le Réalisme (Battle of the Schools—Idealism and Realism), 1855LithographMrs. F.F. Prentiss Fund, 1953.2

    amamblog:

    Now on view in the exhibition “The Human Comedy: Chronicles of 19th Century France.” 

    In this print, the popular proto-realist lithographer Honoré Daumier imagines a battle between the two rival aesthetic schools of mid-century France: neoclassical idealism and contemporary realism. Realism is portrayed as a working-class underdog—his rustic clogs, disheveled, ill-fitting clothes, and short, stocky physique contrast sharply with the athletic nakedness of his rival Idealism. Realism’s small, square palette and clumsy paintbrush seem to be no match for Idealism’s long, uplifted maulstick (used to steady a paintbrush) and great, oval-shaped palette-shield. And yet, Realism’s low center of gravity and determined expression suggest that these forces are not as mis-matched as they may at first appear. The fact that Idealism might be losing his touch (and his relevance) is suggested by his old man’s face and the round spectacles he wears—so at odds with his classically well-proportioned body.

    The Human Comedy is on view through December 22, 2013.

    Image:
    Honoré Daumier (French, 1808–1879)
    Combat des écoles—L’Idéalisme et le Réalisme (Battle of the Schools—Idealism and Realism), 1855
    Lithograph
    Mrs. F.F. Prentiss Fund, 1953.2

    Oct
    07
    2013
  • oberlin-college:

Need a breathtaking photo to boost your Wednesday? Try this one from the Allen Memorial Art Museum, today on oberlin.edu. (via Oberlin College & Conservatory)

    oberlin-college:

    Need a breathtaking photo to boost your Wednesday? Try this one from the Allen Memorial Art Museum, today on oberlin.edu. (via Oberlin College & Conservatory)

    Oct
    03
    2013
  • amamblog:

If you are in the area, we hope you can make it to the next AMAM First Thursday evening hours! “Proper Women, Necessary Women” - Libby Murphy, Associate Professor of French, and Greggor Mattson, Assistant Professor of Sociology, will discuss the gender and sexuality roles evident in the prints in the exhibition “The Human Comedy.” Female dandies, laundresses, housewives and courtesans populated the 19th century imagination, animating realist portrayals in art, literature, journalism and social science. Lecture begins at 5:30pm, with a reception to follow.

    amamblog:

    If you are in the area, we hope you can make it to the next AMAM First Thursday evening hours!

    “Proper Women, Necessary Women” - Libby Murphy, Associate Professor of French, and Greggor Mattson, Assistant Professor of Sociology, will discuss the gender and sexuality roles evident in the prints in the exhibition “The Human Comedy.” Female dandies, laundresses, housewives and courtesans populated the 19th century imagination, animating realist portrayals in art, literature, journalism and social science. Lecture begins at 5:30pm, with a reception to follow.

    Oct
    01
    2013
  • camerasaremyeyes:

Sunset in Oberlin. on Flickr.
Katherine Wright Haskell (class of 1898, sister of Wilbur and Orville) fountain outside the Allen Memorial Art Museum.

    camerasaremyeyes:

    Sunset in Oberlin. on Flickr.

    Katherine Wright Haskell (class of 1898, sister of Wilbur and Orville) fountain outside the Allen Memorial Art Museum.

    Sep
    26
    2013
1/5

Powered by Tumblr | Crystalline designed by Sonny T.

Coffee with Clarence: The Arts at Oberlin

Welcome to Coffee With Clarence, an Oberlin art community blog run by the Clarence Ward Art Library. Check back to find out about art events, new books at the library, work by Oberlin College students and just anything that's interesting and art-related.
EXTRAS