• Clarence says: Here are the winners for the miniature book exhibition! These three received the most votes, though we can only purchase one. Biblioteca Veneziana will now live in the Clarence Ward Art Library!

    Clarence says: Here are the winners for the miniature book exhibition! These three received the most votes, though we can only purchase one. Biblioteca Veneziana will now live in the Clarence Ward Art Library!

    May
    16
    2014
  • oberlin-college:

Senior Studio artists work in a variety of media and produce artists’ statements, professional portfolios, along with the exhibitions. (via Oberlin College & Conservatory)

    oberlin-college:

    Senior Studio artists work in a variety of media and produce artists’ statements, professional portfolios, along with the exhibitions. (via Oberlin College & Conservatory)

    May
    14
    2014
  • May
    13
    2014

  • ocinsolidarity:

    Photos from Reasons for Smoking, a senior art show by Lexy Phillips and Brannon Rockwell-Charland. Here’s to celebrating the artistic pursuits of womyn of Color which are too often ignored by Oberlin College-affiliated media. Photos courtesy of Brannon Rockwell-Charland, 2014.

    May
    13
    2014
  • lvl3:

    Lucas Briffa was born and raised in Oakland, California. He received his BA in Visual Arts from Oberlin College in 2012 and is currently pursuing his MFA at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. From 2012-2013 he spent one year working as a Curatorial Assistant in the Department of…

    Check out this profile of artist Lucas Briffa OC ‘12!

    May
    06
    2014
  • amamblog:

The Real “47 Ronin” - The recently released 47 Ronin, a visually striking film but a critical and box office disappointment, is very loosely based on one of the most famous heroic tales from Japan, typically called Chūshingura 忠臣蔵 (“A Treasury of Loyal Vassals”).  The many versions of the story were inspired by an historical event of the early eighteenth century.  Forty-seven loyal samurai, rendered rōnin 浪人 (lit. “wave” or “wandering”  persons, i.e. masterless samurai) by the unjust death of their lord,  planned an elaborate revenge against the wicked lord who caused their master’s demise.  Chūshingura has been retold and re-imagined in many forms, beginning with the amazing bunraku puppet theater, followed by kabuki theater, and of course many later film, television, manga, and anime versions.  Not surprisingly, the story was also the basis for countless ukiyo-e wooblock prints in Early Modern Japan, and the vast AMAM collection provides us with an excellent example.
In this print by one of Japan’s best-known printmakers, Hiroshige, the forty-seven rōninmake their final assault on the mansion of their enemy.  It is winter, and the white snow that covers the setting also makes the figures stand out in their complex and colorful armor.  Both the tension of the moment and the narrative flow are enhanced by the dramatic diagonals: the line of men, the snow-encrusted pine branch, and the walls of the mansion.  This movement is stopped in the lower left, however, by a moment of drama: the rōnin have cleverly prepared stalks of bamboo, bent and tied like bows.  When one end is inserted in the top of a sliding wooden panel (used in Japanese traditional architecture both for security and insulation) and the other end secured on the ground, cutting the ropes with their swords causes the bamboo to spring apart and pop the panel out of its track, allowing the rōnin to burst unexpectedly into the interior.  Of course if that hadn’t worked, the two rōnin with a giant axe and giant hammer (at the center of the line) might have come in handy.  To see other Chūshingura prints from the series by Hiroshige and others, search the AMAM eMuseum database by clicking here. Although it is only in Japanese with no English subtitles, for a clip from a bunraku puppet theater performance of the scene just preceding the attack, click here.
Image:Utagawa Hiroshige (Japanese, 1797–1858)Breaking into Moronao’s Mansion During the Night Attack, Act 11, no. 2, from the series Chushingura, Mid-1830s Color woodblock print Mary A. Ainsworth Bequest, 1950.1078 

    amamblog:

    The Real “47 Ronin”The recently released 47 Ronin, a visually striking film but a critical and box office disappointment, is very loosely based on one of the most famous heroic tales from Japan, typically called Chūshingura 忠臣蔵 (A Treasury of Loyal Vassals).  The many versions of the story were inspired by an historical event of the early eighteenth century.  Forty-seven loyal samurai, rendered rōnin 浪人 (lit. “wave” or “wandering”  persons, i.e. masterless samurai) by the unjust death of their lord,  planned an elaborate revenge against the wicked lord who caused their master’s demise.  Chūshingura has been retold and re-imagined in many forms, beginning with the amazing bunraku puppet theater, followed by kabuki theater, and of course many later film, television, manga, and anime versions.  Not surprisingly, the story was also the basis for countless ukiyo-e wooblock prints in Early Modern Japan, and the vast AMAM collection provides us with an excellent example.

    In this print by one of Japan’s best-known printmakers, Hiroshige, the forty-seven rōninmake their final assault on the mansion of their enemy.  It is winter, and the white snow that covers the setting also makes the figures stand out in their complex and colorful armor.  Both the tension of the moment and the narrative flow are enhanced by the dramatic diagonals: the line of men, the snow-encrusted pine branch, and the walls of the mansion.  This movement is stopped in the lower left, however, by a moment of drama: the rōnin have cleverly prepared stalks of bamboo, bent and tied like bows.  When one end is inserted in the top of a sliding wooden panel (used in Japanese traditional architecture both for security and insulation) and the other end secured on the ground, cutting the ropes with their swords causes the bamboo to spring apart and pop the panel out of its track, allowing the rōnin to burst unexpectedly into the interior.  Of course if that hadn’t worked, the two rōnin with a giant axe and giant hammer (at the center of the line) might have come in handy.  

    To see other Chūshingura prints from the series by Hiroshige and others, search the AMAM eMuseum database by clicking here

    Although it is only in Japanese with no English subtitles, for a clip from a
    bunraku puppet theater performance of the scene just preceding the attack, click here.


    Image:
    Utagawa Hiroshige (Japanese, 1797–1858)
    Breaking into Moronao’s Mansion During the Night Attack, Act 11, no. 2, from the series Chushingura, Mid-1830s
    Color woodblock print
    Mary A. Ainsworth Bequest, 1950.1078
     

    May
    06
    2014
  • oberlintheater:

This Wednesday to Saturday in Little Theater!

    oberlintheater:

    This Wednesday to Saturday in Little Theater!

    Apr
    30
    2014
  • bullfarm:

it’s actually happeningw/ these too kooks: palmtreepalace and jeancoltrane
!!!!

    bullfarm:

    it’s actually happening
    w/ these too kooks: palmtreepalace and jeancoltrane

    !!!!

    Apr
    30
    2014

  • asylum-art:

    This 16th Century Book Can Be Read Six Different Ways

    Erik Kwakkel Historian

    A few months ago, we showed you a dos-à-dos book—one with a hard back that forms the front of another book. This rare book owned by the National Library of Sweden is even more complex. Erik Kwakkel, a medieval book historian at Leiden University, says that this book is actually six books that are each opened differently. Each book opens and closes with a little clasp.

    All of the books are devotional texts printed in Germany in the 1550s through 1570s, including a copy of Martin Luther’s widely-read The Shorter Catechism.The book is currently owned by the National Swedish Library and resides in Stockholm, among the Royal Library’s archives. Only for advanced readers, advanced readers with low attentions spans.

     via Neatorama

    - Image: National Library of SwedenDesign

    Apr
    29
    2014
  • MONDAY 4.28 PLUG IN: kickoff event 7-9 pm @ Antique Shop Annex (entrance in Apollo lot)
TUESDAY 4.29 Martine Syms Art Talk, “Black Vernacular: Lessons of the Tradition” 5:45 pm, CII (art building)
WEDNESDAY 4.30 CASEY JANE ELLISON (video artist + comedian) performance 10 pm at the ‘Sco
THURSDAY 5.1 Juliana Huxtable and Junglepussy 10 pm at the ‘Sco 10
FRIDAY 5.2 Jen Chan Art Talk 4 pm @ CI (art building)
SATURDAY 5.3 Student Showcase 7-9 pm @ Antique Shop Annex (entrance in Apollo lot)

    MONDAY 4.28 PLUG IN: kickoff event 7-9 pm @ Antique Shop Annex (entrance in Apollo lot)

    TUESDAY 4.29 Martine Syms Art Talk, “Black Vernacular: Lessons of the Tradition” 5:45 pm, CII (art building)

    WEDNESDAY 4.30 CASEY JANE ELLISON (video artist + comedian) performance 10 pm at the ‘Sco

    THURSDAY 5.1 Juliana Huxtable and Junglepussy 10 pm at the ‘Sco 10

    FRIDAY 5.2 Jen Chan Art Talk 4 pm @ CI (art building)

    SATURDAY 5.3 Student Showcase 7-9 pm @ Antique Shop Annex (entrance in Apollo lot)

    Apr
    29
    2014
  • Asian Heritage Month Lecture Series: Pipo Nguyen-duy

    Location: Art Building Room 162 (Photo Lab) Time: 5PM Date: April 29, 2014 


    Join renowned photographer and Oberlin College professor of Studio Art Pipo Nguyen-duy as he showcases his life work and gives words to its engaging imagery. Born in Hue, Vietnam (within thirty kilometers of the Demilitarized Zone separating North and South Vietnam) and having immigrated to the United States in 1975 as a political refugee, Pipo’s photography offers thoughtful insight on the transient spaces created by war, immigration and geographical boundaries. Much like the life he has crafted within such interstices, Pipo’s photography speaks of  more than what appears within a picture’s borders.

    Apr
    29
    2014
  • Lecture: The Impossible Convention

    The Impossible Convention – Hybrid music-art practices in Gotham and beyond

    Tuesday, April 29 at 4:30pm Allen Memorial Art Building, Classroom 1

    Join the Art department and Nick Hallett (OC ‘97) for “The Impossible Convention – Hybrid music-art practices in Gotham and beyond”. Over the past 15 years, Nick Hallett ‘97 has built a creative practice which connects music to visual forms, with the human voice at its core.  His projects in the art world span opera, visual music, historic re-performance, and media ritual.  Refreshments to be served afterwards.
    Apr
    29
    2014
  • As I Am is making a comeback!

    We are looking for submissions from all A/PI communities on campus for this semesterly magazine. We welcome anything that can be printed like interviews, short stories, poems, writing, art, photos, screenplays, comics, music scores, etc.! Submissions may be sent to oberlinasiam@gmail.com or http://asiamoberlin.tumblr.com/ (to do so anonymously). The deadline for submissions is Sunday April 20th.

    For more information about As I Am, please read the statement of purpose from a previous year below:

    As I Am presents a collection of voices from the Asian/Pacific Islander Diaspora (A/PID) communities at Oberlin. It is a publication that strives to reflect our communities’ needs while serving as an outlet for the creative expressions of its members. While we acknowledge the fact that it cannot fully represent the complexity of our diverse communities, our hope is that As I Am will serve as an inclusive space for Asian diasporic narratives.

    Click here for a digital copy of the Spring 2013 issue! 

    Apr
    17
    2014
  • AMAM Curatorial Research Assistant, Summer 2014

    A part-time (15-20 hours/week) Oberlin College student is needed for the summer 2014 term to aid the Curator of European and American Art in collections research and in preparations for upcoming exhibitions. The student will assist with the installation of the upcoming exhibition “Art and Life in Early America: The First Hundred Years, 1776-1876,” as well as contribute to research on the AMAM’s collection. The applicant must have taken at least 4 courses in art history or another relevant field, and have excellent research and writing skills. Preference will be given to students interested in art prior to 1900 and to those who have knowledge of French, Italian, or German.

    Please submit a one-page resume with GPA and the names of three references (Oberlin faculty preferred), a one-page cover letter with a brief summary of interest and abilities, and an unofficial transcript to Andaleeb Banta, abanta@oberlin.edu, Curator of European and American Art, by Friday, April 25, 2013. Only candidates selected for an interview will be contacted

    Apr
    17
    2014
  • Apr
    17
    2014
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Coffee with Clarence: The Arts at Oberlin

Welcome to Coffee With Clarence, an Oberlin art community blog run by the Clarence Ward Art Library. Check back to find out about art events, new books at the library, work by Oberlin College students and just anything that's interesting and art-related.
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